delusioninabox:

Daily #492! Some days may even be a bit of both.

(Source: )

colourfulpantsandarainbowhat:

WHY DO PEOPLE CALL IT FUCK, MARRY, KILL WHEN THEY COULD CALL IT BED, WED, BEHEAD

silversora:

If a dead ancestor doesn’t appear in the sky to stop me, it can’t be that bad of a decision

the-adequate-gatsby:

no homo

whole homo

2% homo

skim homo

soy homo

almond homo

coconut homo

rice homo

butter homo

#I Can’t Believe It’s Not Homo

(Source: femalemaincharacter)

moniquill:

blue-author:

cannibaliza:

allcreatures:

This black and white spotted lamb seems to think he is a Dalmatian dog. The lamb was born at a dog breeder’s farm in South Australia’s Barossa Valley. After being rejected by his mother he was quickly adopted by dog Zoe and the pair are now inseparable. The dotty lamb follows her around the farm and even sleeps inside the dog kennel.

Picture: Media Mode Pty Ltd / Rex Features (via Pictures of the day: 15 August 2012 - Telegraph)

NO OH MY GOSH

"Here, Zoe, have a little ewe."

"A LITTLE ME!"

Reblogging a second time for epic wordplay.

saltybalthy:

queenrinacat:

fezturions:

carryonmywaywardsamanddean:

ice-jade:

LOL = LUCIFER OUR LORD.
YOLO= YOUTH OBEYING LUCIFER’S ORDERS.
SWAG = SATAN’S WISHES ARE GRANTED.
ROFL = RISE, OUR FATHER LUCIFER.
WTF= WORSHIP THE FALLEN.

wtf is wrong with this website

worship the fallen is wrong with this website

LOL who art in the fiery pit of hell I swear to WTF as a YOLO. ROFL, for SWAG.

image

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

(Source: maxistentialist)

this-is-chris-colfers-world:

hey-bad-batter-hey:

imjustkt:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

My mom is a travel agent and I can confirm that people are legitimately this stupid when it comes to travel.

"It took us 9 hours to get home to England but the Americans only took 3  hours this is unfair" OH YES LET ME JUST REARRANGE THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE FUCKING PLANET FOR YOU SIR TERRIBLY SORRY

Whenever I think “oh this is the funniest one” I read the next one and I just can’t